Ashi Home Inspector Creola

Ashi Home Inspector Creola

When you need a home inspection, you want to make sure you get a good one here in the Creola area. First, you need to know what a good home inspection is. Then you need to know how to find a home inspector who can, and will, give you the home inspection that serves you well. And last, you want to know how much you should pay for this quality home inspection by a good home inspector.

Licensed Home Inspector Near Me

Home Inspection Misconceptions

A thorough home inspection is a vital part of buying any home, condo, or other type of dwelling. This inspection can protect you from expensive financial costs later on, because of defects that were not noticed and that you were not aware of. A home inspector has training and an education in factors that show hidden defects, such as signs of hidden water damage or electrical problems. A home inspection is a visual inspection of all areas and components of the home, both inside and out, that are accessible to the inspector. This includes the roof, the attic, the interior and exterior walls, all the windows and doors, all systems including heating, plumbing, and electrical, and much more. A knowledgeable and experienced home inspector can provide valuable information about a home that can prevent you from making a costly mistake if conditions are too bad. Not all home problems and flaws are readily visible to the inexperienced eye, and this is where a quality and thorough home inspection can help.

There are some things that may not be covered under a home inspection, and each state and inspection firm may have rules that vary. Some inspections do not cover mold testing, air quality testing, radon testing, wood eating insect testing, water testing, and other types of testing. Some home inspection businesses will perform some of these testing services for free or a charge, while others do not. Most home inspections cover the basic visual components of the home and the operation, condition, and function of the systems. Almost all the licensed home inspection companies can have these testing services performed for you through a third party, but these tests may not be considered routine.

A home inspection, is not a pass or fail type of test, but rather a complete and detailed overview of the condition of every possible aspect of the home that can be visually inspected. The inspector will check the door and window conditions and operation, look at the foundation and any slabs, check all the systems in the home, and basically go over the home from the bottom up, both inside and out. Even gutters, eaves, flashing, and the yard should be looked at. The fees charged for a home inspection will vary, depending on several factors. The size of the home, the location and state where the home is, any additional testing that is desired or needed, the age of the home, and the home inspection service used. A normal range for this inspection can usually run between five hundred dollars and up depending upon size, age and location of the property. This may seem like a big expense, but when you consider that a complete and thorough home inspection may reveal thousands of dollars in repairs and maintenance needed it is quite reasonable.

A home inspection can usually take between two and four hours, depending on the size and complexity of the home, but this can vary. The inspector may bring a checklist for the inspection that will cover every possible aspect of any home, plus there is usually room for handwritten observations as well. The home inspection checklist can consist of many pages, and each page may deal with a specific aspect or room, such as the master bathroom, or exterior walls. Each system involved, will normally have their own section also. Once the inspection is complete you will receive a complete typewritten report from the inspector, outlining both the negative and positive aspects of the home. This can also help you determine what maintenance is needed and when it must be done. Not all parts of a home inspection are negative, and every home may have a few problems. Sometimes a homeowner may have an inspection done just to ensure there are no hidden maintenance problems with their home.

It is a good idea for you to be present during the home inspection for many reasons. First, by being present you will have a chance to ask any questions you may have about the home or certain aspects. Following the inspector during the inspection will also give you a much clearer idea of what is involved with the different systems, and will help you understand the final home inspection report a lot better. Sometimes a buyer may feel confident and think that if they do a good visual inspection it is not necessary to have a home inspector come in and do an inspection. This is a common mistake. Sure you can see bare wires hanging out of the wall, but do you know the signs of hidden mold or previous flooding damage? Most of us do not know the hidden signs of home damage and problems, and this can lead to a serious problem being overlooked, and becoming a big financial burden once you have bought the home. You should always insist on a quality professional home inspection before buying any home, to avoid making a big mistake that can cost you later on.

Finding a qualified home inspector to do the home inspection is not difficult. You can look in the yellow pages of your local phone book, or ask around for references from friends and family. Talk to a few different companies, and then choose the one that seems right for you. Ask about professional ethics, qualifications, any licensing, and experience. Check with your local better business bureau for complaints against the company or the home inspector before making a final decision on which company to use. The best time to call for a home inspector is as soon as the purchase agreement is signed. Normally a home inspection can be done within a week, but sometimes this may not be the case. Calling as soon as possible will ensure that your purchase is not held up waiting on the inspection to occur. A home inspection is the best way to protect yourself and know about the true condition of any home before you buy it. This will be one of the biggest investments you will ever make, and you owe it to yourself to make sure the investment is a good one.

Request An Inspection

Best Home Inspectors Near Me

Home Inspection Misconceptions

Request An Inspection

Ask a dozen Home Inspectors, or make it a bakers dozen if you will, what it is that makes a Home Inspection report a GOOD Home Inspection report, and you are just liable to get 12 or, make it 13, different answers. Well, maybe there wouldn't be that much disparity in response, but you get the general idea...there almost certainly wouldn't be any unanimous consensus. Because individual Home Inspection reports, just as with individual Home Inspectors, simply aren't created equally...one report absolutely is not (allow me to be repetitive here for emphasis)...is not just like the next...neither in content or in quality.

There are many differing opinions as to what constitutes a good Home Inspection report and this is evidenced by the large number of report formats and the myriad of various software programs that are used to create reports. Having been in the Home Inspection industry for more than 15 years, I was creating written (gulp...yes, hand-written) reports using carbon copy report forms, in triplicate (three copies...press hard, please) back when there weren't any computers involved in the process. In fact, I had to be drug, not quite actually by my hair, and not quite literally...but almost...kicking and screaming, into what I'll refer to as the modern computer age. In retrospect, it was a definitive change for the better (in most ways, anyway...I have yet to have my wrist "crash"...but I digress). As the owner of a Raleigh Home Inspection firm, I have my own professional opinion as to what goes into the production of a good Home Inspection, and as to what a good Home Inspection report should be.

There is differing opinion amongst professional Home Inspectors as to whether a checklist style of report should be used...or whether a narrative style report should be used. In the former, issues or problems (I have never have liked referring to issues as problems, even though an issue may very well be, and likely is, a problem for someone...) are conveyed to the reader using boxes that are checked off. In the latter, issues are presented using narrative, wherein each problem is identified by writing out those issues. In reality, most reports are a combination of the two. The combination style of report is the one that I prefer and recommend to other Home Inspectors; descriptive commentary e.g. materials or types of components, can be conveyed using a check box with the real issues conveyed using narrative.

So, what are the...ingredients...necessary to create and provide a good Home Inspection report?

To preface any discussion regarding this subject topic, and from a clients perspective (who is likely relying on the contents of the report to make a well-informed real estate purchasing decision), it is important that the Inspector be experienced, knowledgeable about most all related issues that might be encountered, and be entirely professional toward both the Home Inspection process as a whole and toward the client/buyer specifically. This must be, in my opinion, accepted as a given and be considered a baseline requirement. The overall philosophy of the Inspector should be to provide their client with not only a good inspection experience, but an excellent inspection experience. Of course, it should be herein acknowledged that if the home has a really large number of serious issues, then the experience may not seem like such a good one to the client at the time...but that's likely (or should be) the fault of the condition of the home itself rather than the fault of the Inspector. In the event of a less than stellar report resulting from an Inspection of a particular home, the client is able to revel in the fact that their professional Home Inspector, and their most excellent and professionally produced Home Inspection report precluded their buying the proverbial Money Pit and their having any number of unexpected or unanticipated expenses associated with their home purchase.

Obviously, any report absolutely must provide the client value...with, at the very least, a good representation of the condition of the property. If a report doesn't do that, then the report is likely not worth anything...it would be worthless even if it were free.

Among other things, a Good Home Inspection Report should:

* Be well organized and well presented; the report should layout and presentation should be logical...it should be organized so as to provide a sort of road map, if you will, around and through the home

* Be well written...and be readily understandable by anyone irregardless of whether or not they have ever been to the physical property and irrespective of their technical background. The report should, to every extent possible, be devoid of technical nomenclature that requires yet more explanation to be understood; it should be concise and clear. A report that has to be interpreted is of little overall value

* Provide enough detail, description and direction to provide not only the client, but anyone involved in the transaction e.g. real estate agents, attorneys, mortgage lenders, etc., with a clear representation of the physical condition of the property

* Contain enough, but not an excessive number, of digital photographs relating directly to significant or serious issues. It has been said that a picture is worth a thousand words...this is true of a home inspection report. Photographs make it immeasurably easier to identify and understand any particular issue. On the other hand, a report loaded with photographs that lend no additional value to a report and are provided as filler content, or to provide a CYB (Cover Your Buttocks..) function for the Inspector, are best left out of a report

* Be presented using plain, but grammatically correct language. There is no place in a professional Home Inspection report for misspelled words, fragmented sentences, and general misuse of the English language (or whatever language is appropriate). A report filled with these types of deficiencies is, and again in my opinion, directly indicative of the professionalism of the Inspector

* Be presented in a straight-forward manner...if there are reportable issues present, then they should be presented in such a way as to leave no doubt that they are, indeed, issues. There should be no Soft-Shoeing...no Song and Dance...no Weasel-wording...just straight talk, accurate description, and effective commentary. Further, there should be some commentary provided to explain why an issue is an issue, and how to go about correcting that issue or otherwise obtaining other professional opinion regarding its correction

* Contain a well-designed Summary Section...a section of the report where all significant, and potentially significant, issues are clearly identified. General information, suggestion regarding routine maintenance, or recommendations regarding the upgrade of the property should not be included in the Summary section of the report. That type of information should most certainly be provided in the report for the benefit of the client...just not in the Summary section of the report

A client in search of a professional Home Inspection should inquire of any potential candidate Inspector as to what type of report they produce...nor should they be at all shy or hesitant about asking that the considered Inspector to provide a sample of their inspection report. That way, a client will have a very good representative idea of what they can expect from the Home Inspector. The nursery rhyme that goes...Patty Cake...Patty Cake, Bakers Man...Bake Me A Cake As Fast As You Can...may have been good for Mother Goose; but when it comes to a Home Inspection and the resulting report, you may or may not want to get it just as fast as you can... but you certainly, absolutely, and most unequivocally want it to be just as GOOD as you can get it!

If a Home Inspection report incorporates all of the previously identified components, then it is highly predictable that the result will be a Good inspection report...and maybe even an Excellent inspection report. Isn't that what a consumer should be searching for...and be entitled to receive I might add, in exchange for their hard-earned dollars... a most Excellent Home Inspection report?

The Main Types of Home Inspections

Best Home Inspectors Near Me

Are you buying a home? Buying a home is probably the most complicated (and important) purchase most of us will make in our lifetime. Like any major purchase there are features and specifications for all homes. On paper it may be the features that sell the home but if any of those features are in disrepair, you might be signing up for more than you bargained for and getting less than you paid for.

When you're purchasing a home, you need to know what you're getting. There are a few ways you can help protect yourself -- one of them is with a thorough home inspection. Hiring a qualified home inspection company to take a look at the home you're interested in buying is very important. At the same time, you need to understand what's involved with a home inspection so years after your purchase, you can keep up with the maintenance of your home. Here's why...

When you are buying a home it is important that you understanding what's involved with a home inspection. It can pay dividends for the rest of the time you own your house.

First, it's important to note that some things are not covered in a standard home inspection:

* Pests - Pest inspections require a licensed pest control specialist to perform inspections of building structures to determine damage or possibility of damage from pests.

* Radon -- Radon gas is an invisible, odorless gas produced by the normal breakdown of uranium in the soil.

* Lead paint - Inspecting a home for lead-based paint is not typically included in a home inspection because it takes place over several days and requires special equipment.

* Mold - Mold inspection is a separate inspection because it requires three separate air samples and surface sample analysis. Since mold inspection is beyond the scope of a traditional home inspection, be sure to specifically ask your home inspector if he or she would recommend a mold inspection.

* Asbestos - Asbestos is generally outside the scope of a home inspection because asbestos requires its own thorough review. Like with mold inspections, be sure to specifically ask your home inspector if he or she would recommend a separate asbestos inspection.

* Orangeberg Sewer Pipe -- Also known as "fiber conduit", Orangeberg Sewer Pipe is bitumenized fiber pipe made from layers of wood pulp and pitch pressed together. It was used from the 1860s through the 1970s, when it was replaced by PVC pipe for water delivery and ABS pipe for drain-waste-vent (DWV) applications.

The first thing to point out is that every home and home buyer are different which means that every home inspection is different and the importance of home inspection items are different. Below are some common things that are inspected during a home inspection. Keep in mind that some items in this checklist may not be necessary for your particular home - and that this list does not include all the item inspected by a professional home inspection service.

General Home Inspection Checklist

Lot and Neighborhood

Lot Area

* Does the grade slope away from the home or towards the home

* Are there any areas where the soil has settled near the foundation or driveway?

* What is the elevation of the home in relation to the street and neighbors?

Exterior

Roofing

* Is the peak of the roof straight and level? Or is there sagging?

* What is the condition of the roof vents? Are they visible?

* Are there gaps between flashing and chimneys, walls or other parts of the roof?

* Is there sagging anywhere else on the roof such as between the rafters or trusses?

* What kind of shingles are used? How much deterioration has set in such as curling, warping, broken shingles or wider gaps between shingles in the roof?

Chimney

* Is the chimney square to the home and level? Or is it leaning?

* What is the condition of the bricks? Are any bricks flaking or missing?

* What is the condition of the mortar? Is it cracked, broken or missing entirely?

Siding

* Is the siding original to the house? If not, how old is the siding and how is it holding up?

* Are the walls square and level or bowed, bulged or leaning

* What material is the siding? Brick, wood or plastic?

* What condition is the siding in?

* Is there loose, missing, rotten or deteriorated siding or paint?

* How does the siding fit connect to the foundation?

Soffits and Fascia

* What are the soffits and fascia made of? Common materials include wood, aluminum or plastic?

* Are there any problems such as rotting or broken pieces?

* Are there any missing pieces of soffit or fascia?

Gutters and Downspouts

* Are there any leaks or gaps in gutters or downspouts?

* Does the gutter slope toward downspouts?

* Is there any rust or peeling paint?

* Are all gutters and downspouts securely fastened?

* Is there a sufficient separation of the downspouts from the foundation?

Doors and Windows

* Are there any problems with paint, caulking or rotten wood?

* Are the windows original to the home? If not, how old are they?

Decks or Porches

* What is the porch or deck made of? Check for paint problems, rotted wood and wood-earth contact.

* Is there any settlement or separation from the house?

* If possible, inspect the underside of the porch or deck.

Foundation

* Are there any cracks, flaking or damaged masonry?

* Are there any water markings and powdery substances on the foundation? If so where are they located?

* Are the walls square vertically and horizontally? Or bowed, bulged or leaning?

Basement

* Is there any evidence of water penetration (stains, mildew/odors, powdery substances, loose tiles, etc.)

Flooring

* Is there any deterioration of flooring or carpet?

* Are there any cracks in the tiles or mortar?

* Do you notice any water damage or stains from previous water damage?

* Is there any sagging or sloped flooring?

Interior Walls

* Check that the majority of windows and doors work.

* Are the walls square and vertically and horizontally straight?

* Is there any cracked or loose plaster?

* Look for stains, physical damage or evidence of previous repair.

* Are there any drywall seams or nails showing?

Ceilings

* Review all plaster for cracks or loose or sagging areas.

* Are there any stains from water or mechanical damage or evidence of previous repair?

* Are there any seams or nails showing?

Kitchens and Bathrooms

* Check that all fixtures are secure including sinks, faucets, toilets and cabinetry

* Are there any cracks in the fixtures?

* What is the condition of the tiles and caulking surrounding sinks and tub and shower areas?

* What is the condition of the faucets? Do they work? Is there sufficient water pressure?

* Check under countertops for any water stains or rotting materials.

* Check that the majority of the cabinet doors and drawers are in working order.

Electrical and Mechanical

* Type, style and age of heating and cooling systems with service history.

* Type, age and condition of water supply piping and drains.

* Size and age of electrical service -- Are the outlets grounded? Visible wiring in good condition?

The Importance of a Home Inspection Professional

As you can see, the home inspection checklist is exhaustive (and this list doesn't even cover it all!) So if you're in the market for a new house or are in the process of purchasing a new home, make sure you have a home inspection done by a reliable home inspection company - so you can protect yourself from the unforeseen. Also periodically review the items on this home inspection checklist so you can ensure the working order of your home for years to come.

Request An Inspection

 


2018-06-04T19:58:03+00:00June 4th, 2018|Mobile County Alabama What Do House Inspectors Look For|Comments Off on Ashi Home Inspector Creola